Believe it or not, there are thousands of abandoned homes across the United States. Some lavish estates that were once worth millions of dollars are now in crumbled ruins.

While some have been demolished and others left to rot, a few find new owners, who have restored or renovated the homes or opened them to the public to explore in all their glory.

But these abandoned homes aren’t just relics. Plenty of isolated properties have chilling pasts and spooky stories hiding inside their history.

Despite their downfalls, there is something beautiful about these archaic homes, as they have been molded and transformed by their surrounding environs and the decay that comes with time. 

Scroll through to see six abandoned mansions that are hauntingly beautiful. 

Swingers Tiki Palace | Chattanooga, Tennessee

The Swingers Tiki Palace was severely vandalized in 2015.
The Swingers Tiki Palace was severely vandalized in 2015.
Caters News

This fixture of Chattanooga was built as a private home for strip-club tycoon Billy Hull in 1972.

The anticipation of the party mansion, which took 14 months to complete, led to almost 10,000 people attending the housewarming party, according to Abandoned Southeast.

The 5,600-square-foot home had three bedrooms and 4.5 baths, and was built to host blowout parties. It was most famously known for its unique Playboy Bunny-shaped pool, which had swim tunnels leading to separate bedrooms. The pool, surrounded by live palm trees, was the focal point of the home, which would be the first thing you saw the moment you entered. 

The notorious Playboy-style pool, which had swim tunnels leading to separate bedrooms.
The notorious Playboy pool, which had swim tunnels leading to separate bedrooms.
Caters News
The marble bar in the back of the home.
The marble bar in the back of the home
Caters News

The hallways and bathrooms were covered in marble from floor to ceiling. Some rooms’ walls were adorned with palm matting, Tiki-style bamboo and animal heads. There was also a full marble bar in the back of the house surrounded by mirrored walls leading to the outdoors. 

The patio featured a 12-person Jacuzzi, a bar made of copper, as well as a large sauna.

The 20 by 40 pool is 12 feet deep with a chandelier overhead, and is electrically heated.
The 20-by-40-foot pool was 12 feet deep with a chandelier overhead and electrical heating.
Caters News
The ruined terrace overlooking the Chattanooga valley.
The terrace overlooked the Chattanooga valley.
Caters News

But what started as a dream home for Hull quickly turned into a nightmare.

On May 3, 1973, his friend Larry Parker shot and killed Roland Hargis as he was leaving the Tradewinds Night Club. Hargis was the lover of Gloria Hull, Billy’s wife.

Billy was found guilty of murder-for-hire and sentenced to 20 years in prison. 

Billy Hull and Gloria Hull at the 'Swinger' palace.
Billy and Gloria Hull at their home, the Tiki Palace.
Published in 1972 in Trade magazine
What is leftover of the now cryptic hallway that led to the many bedrooms.
What was leftover of the hallway that led to the home’s three bedrooms took on a cryptic quality.
Caters News

By the 1980s, Hull was left bankrupt. Charges of tax evasion while he was still incarcerated took a toll on him financially, court records show. 

Hull died of cancer in 2008. Afterward, a few family members moved in and out of the home before it was vacated. 

In 2014, it was listed for sale, but by 2015, the property had been severely vandalized and forced into foreclosure. It was later seized by the government due to unpaid taxes.

On Sep. 7, 2017, the Swingers Tiki Palace was demolished.

The Page Mansion | Aberdeen, North Carolina 

The 6,000 square-feet brick manor has sat vacant for over 40 years.
The 6,000-square-foot brick manor sat vacant for over 40 years.
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This historic 6,000-square-foot brick manor, located in Aberdeen, North Carolina, sat vacant for over 40 years, hidden behind an overgrown landscape. 

Designed by J.M. McMichael and built in 1913, the home featured six bedrooms and four bathrooms, plus servants’ quarters with a designated set of stairs leading directly into the butler’s pantry and the kitchen. The home had a traditional center hall, a grand staircase and formal dining rooms and parlors. 

Another scene of the deteriorated Page mansion.
A sun-drenched room with walls of windows in the deteriorated Page Mansion
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The old formal living room.
The old formal living room
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In 1880, Allison Francis “Frank” Page began purchasing great tracts of pines and established a lumber mill on Devil’s Gut Creek, later known as Aberdeen Creek. Aberdeen’s economy flourished under Page, who was responsible for developing several homes for his neighbors. He also built this home for his own family, on a hill that overlooks Aberdeen Lake — an area that became known as Page Hill. It is one of only a few historic Page family homes, which are reminiscent of the time when wealthy industrialists transformed the local landscape.

The property was historically known as the Page-Wilder House and was briefly renamed Willow Oak Manor in recent years after businessmen attempted unsuccessfully to convert the abandoned home into a special-events venue.

One of six bedrooms.
One of six bedrooms
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Furniture from the wood-burning living space is left behind.
The wood-burning fireplace in the living space is left behind.
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Now simply called the Page Mansion, the home was listed for sale in 2017, only accepting cash offers. 

Sitting on 1 acre of land, this exquisite home needed some major TLC to bring it back to its glamorous past — and that dream came to life when it found some lucky owners.

One of the abandoned bathrooms.
One of four abandoned bathrooms
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A year after it was put on the market, North Carolina natives Abby and Trey Brothers saw the property on a whim and decided to snag the home, renovate it and grow their family. 

“On April 1 — and this is not an April Fool’s joke — I found our home,” Abby told the Sway. “I wasn’t even looking around Moore County at the time, but by sheer accident, I expanded my search area. There it was: the Page Mansion. I jokingly took a picture of the home and sent it to my husband with the caption: ‘Let’s buy it and renovate it.’ He immediately called me to ask for more information about the home, and we started researching. In all honesty, it was love at first sight!”

The Outlaw House | Mobile County, Alabama

In the early 20th century, the Outlaw House was one of the few large period revival dwellings constructed in Alabama.
Leland Kent – Abandoned Southeast

This home dates back to 1914 and was once considered one of Alabama’s finest examples of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture. The home was acquired by George Outlaw in 1925, who founded the southern chain restaurant Morrison’s Cafeteria, according to Abandoned Southeast.

The chain boomed due to its simple homestyle recipes, self-service and modest prices. 

The Outlaw House in rural Mobile County dates back to 1914.
Leland Kent – Abandoned Southeast
Since there are no records indicating a sale, it is rumored Outlaw won the house in a poker game.
Leland Kent – Abandoned Southeast

Designed by renowned architect George Bigelow Rogers, the home boasts thick stucco walls, arched doorways and overhanging eaves in a Mediterranean style. Rogers is known to have designed many of Alabama’s landmark staples, including the Mobile Public Library, Bellingrath House and the Van Antwerp Building.

Since there are no records of the sale of the home, it is suspected Outlaw won the property in a poker game. 

At the time, the estate included 120 acres of land with a 17-acre lake built onto the property, known as Outlaw’s Lake. 

The thick stucco walls, arched doorways, overhanging eaves and solid massing convey in spirit and execution a certain Mediterranean flair.
Leland Kent – Abandoned Southeast
The house was designed by notable architect George Bigelow Rogers, who designed many Alabama landmarks including the Mobile Public Library, Bellingrath House and the Van Antwerp Building.
Leland Kent – Abandoned Southeast

Following Outlaw’s death in 1964, his adult son returned from the city to renovate the property for the local police chief. Then in the 1980s, his son lived in the home, until conflict arose when he became mayor of Mobile. He was forced to move with his family to a home within Mobile city limits. 

Today, the now-abandoned home is still owned by the Outlaw family, and a portion of the property is used for hunting and tree farming. But any future plans to renovate the home are still unknown.

Outlaw, along with James Arthur Morrison, founded Morrison’s Cafeteria in 1920.
Leland Kent – Abandoned Southeast
George Outlaw acquired the property in 1925.
Leland Kent – Abandoned Southeast

Lynnewood Hall | Elkins Park, Pennsylvania

Situated on almost 34 gated acres of land, the neoclassical property boasts 110 rooms.
Situated on almost 34 gated acres of land, the neoclassical property boasts 110 rooms.
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Lynnewood Hall is considered the largest surviving Gilded Age mansion and has been referred to as a haunted house in the Philadelphia area. Situated on almost 34 gated acres of land, the neoclassical property boasts 110 rooms. Of those rooms, 55 are bedrooms and 20 are bathrooms. 

The abandoned mansion itself spans 70,000 square feet. It was initially listed for $16.5 million in 2017, but the price was slashed to $11 million two years later. The estate has since been taken off the market without any offers. 

Of the 110 rooms, 55 are bedrooms, and 20 are bathrooms. 
Of the 110 rooms, 55 are bedrooms and 20 are bathrooms. 
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Built in 1897, it was designed by architect Horace Trumbauer for industrialist Peter A.B. Widener at the time. Widener was a founding partner in the Philadelphia Traction Company, which electrified the city’s trolley lines and expanded into other major cities in the United States.

He used his wealth from the company to become a founding member of US Steel and the American Tobacco Company, as well as investing a large amount of his profits in Standard Oil, which substantially expanded his coffers.

The abandoned mansion itself spans 70,000 square-feet.
The abandoned mansion itself spans 70,000 square feet.
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In the Lynnewood mansion, Widener and his son housed one of the most important private art collections of European masterpieces and decorative arts. He donated more than 2,000 sculptures, paintings, and decorative and porcelain works to the National Gallery of Art. This included Raphael’s “Small Cowper Madonna,” Bellini’s “The Feast of the Gods,” eight van Dycks, two Vermeers and 14 Rembrandts. 

Peter A.B.Widener, the owner of the home at the time, donated donated more than 2,000 sculptures, paintings, decorative art works, and porcelains to the National Gallery of Art.
Peter A.B. Widener, who had the estate built last the turn of the last century, donated more than 2,000 sculptures, paintings, decorative artworks and porcelains to the National Gallery of Art.
realtor.com

In addition to the bedrooms, the estate held a large art gallery, a ballroom large enough for 1,000 guests, a swimming pool, wine cellars, a farm, carpentry and upholstery studios and an electrical power plant.

Following Widener’s death, the home suffered a general decline. In 2003, it was added to the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia’s list of the most endangered historic properties. It is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

In addition to the bedrooms, the estate held a large art gallery, a ballroom large enough for 1,000 guests, a swimming pool, wine cellars, a farm, carpentry and upholstery studios, and an electrical power plant.
In addition to the bedrooms, the estate held a large art gallery, a ballroom large enough for 1,000 guests, a swimming pool, wine cellars, a farm, carpentry and upholstery studios and an electrical power plant.
realtor.com

Ha Ha Tonka State Park ruins | Missouri 

Stone walls of an ancient castle bathed in golden light at sunset in Ha Ha Tonka State Park, Missouri, USA
Stone walls of an ancient castle bathed in golden light at sunset in Ha Ha Tonka State Park, Missouri.
Alamy Stock Photo

It was supposed to be a castle, but now, it’s just beautiful ruins. 

The Ha Ha Tanka ruins initially started construction in 1905 by Robert McClure Snyder, a Kansas City businessman. 

Snyder purchased the expansive property after his first visit there in 1903. 

ancient castle wall bathed in golden light at sunset in Ha Ha Tonka State Park, Southwest Missouri
The name Ha Ha Tonka is said to to mean “smiling waters,” inspired by the natural springs on the property. 
Alamy Stock Photo
The park is a geologic wonderland featuring sinkholes, caves, a huge natural bridge, sheer bluffs and Missouri's 12th largest spring.
The park is a geologic wonderland, featuring sinkholes, caves, a huge natural bridge, sheer bluffs and Missouri’s 12th largest spring.
Alamy Stock Photo

Ha Ha Tonka is named after the natural springs on the property and means “smiling waters.” 

Unfortunately, before construction on the castle was complete, Snyder died in a car crash in 1906. His sons then carried out the completion of the home, finishing just before the Wall Street Crash of 1929. 

In 1942, the castle was destroyed by a fire.
In 1942, the castle was destroyed by a fire.
Alamy Stock Photo

The property was used by the family as a summer and weekend home, until the 1930s when it was used as a hotel. 

In 1942, the castle was destroyed by a fire, but 35 years later, the state purchased the property as a state park. It opened to the public in 1978. 

The Carleton Island Villa | Cape Vincent, New York

The Carleton Island Villa sits on 6.9 acres, holds 50 rooms, and three waterfronts.
The Carleton Island Villa
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The Carleton Island Villa sits on 6.9 acres and holds 50 rooms. Built in 1895, the estate served as a private home until 1927. It has since remained vacant. 

To buy this beast, it will cost you $495,000. And if you think that’s a steal for a true manse, think again. The deeply decayed property will require millions more dollars to restore it to its former glory.

Built in 1895, the home was lived in until 1927. It has since remained vacant for over 70 years. 
Built in 1895, the home was lived in until 1927 and never again since.
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On the market for more three years, the home has not lured in a buyer. 

The once-grand mansion was built on the small island as a vacation home for businessman William O. Wyckoff, who amassed his fortune as president of the newly invented typewriter division of arms manufacturer E. Remington & Sons.

The home is currently listed at $495,000.
The home is currently listed at $495,000.
realtor.com
Despite being on the market for over three years, the home has not lured in a buyer. 
Despite being on the market for over three years, the home has not lured in a buyer. 
realtor.com

Designed by William Henry Miller, an architect known for his work at Cornell University, the mansion served only briefly as Wyckoff’s residence. After spending just one night in the mansion, he reportedly died of a heart attack. 

His wife had died from a heart attack just a couple months prior, before they moved into the home. 

The once-grand mansion was built on the small island in the 1890s as a vacation home for businessman William O. Wyckoff.
The once-grand mansion was built on a small island in the 1890s as a vacation home for businessman William O. Wyckoff.
realtor.com

The home was then passed down to his son, who would live there until 1927. During the Great Depression, the family lost much of their fortune. In the 1930s, General Electric took ownership of the property and planned to use the property as a company retreat.

Bad timing struck once again, with the outbreak of World War II. The company had to abandon its plans, and contractors were called to remove materials, including the marble cladding from the tower base.

Its current listing agent estimates it would take up to $12 million to fix up the home.

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