The Upper West Side home where the late Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara raised their children, Amy and Ben, has entered contract after hitting the market for $5 million in July.

Back then, Ben — who is working on a documentary about his late parents that will include his childhood home at 118 Riverside Drive — told the New York Times that he remembered Thanksgiving dinners with Rodney Dangerfield and various other gatherings with guests including William Hurt, Sylvia Miles and Francis Ford Coppola. (Jerry Stiller, 92, died in 2020; Meara, 85, died in 2015.)

The siblings played with other kids in the building, including those of the artist Peter Max, and loved to cause trouble like tossing water balloons out the apartment’s windows.

Ben loved the building so much that he lived there with his wife, Christine Taylor, in happier days. (Though they announced a split in 2017 they are often still photographed together.) 

The couple bought a duplex for $10 million there from Ann Zabar in 2008, then took a $1 million hit when they sold it for $8.99 million in 2013. Beyond its memories and long-held family residents, the light-filled unit, which faces Riverside Park, is 3,700 square feet, and comes with five bedrooms and 4½ bathrooms.

It is a two-unit combo and features a private elevator foyer, an open kitchen, a library/den and a sauna. The listing brokers are Douglas Elliman’s Bruce Ehrmann and Andrew Anderson. 

A portrait of Jack Greenberg, American lawyer and head of the N.A.A.C.P. Legal Defense Fund sits on his desk in his office at 10 Columbus Circle, New York City
Another unit in the Riverside Drive building once occupied by Civil Rights attorney Jack Greenberg hit the market.
Larry Morris/New York Times Co./Getty Images

Another two-unit combo in this building, home to the late civil rights lawyer Jack Greenberg and his late wife, Deborah Cole Greenberg, hit the market in October for $4.79 million. Now, the price has been trimmed to $4.39 million.

Greenberg joined the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund in 1949 and succeeded Thurgood Marshall as its director-counsel from 1961 to 1984.

He was also co-counsel with Marshall for the historic Brown v. Board of Education case, which ended segregation in public schools, arguing it before the Supreme Court.

In later years, he served as dean of Columbia College and vice dean of Columbia Law School.

He died in 2016 at age 91.

The 3,300-square-foot home has four bedrooms and four bathrooms. It comes with river and park views, large picture windows, lots of storage, hardwood floors and two deeded storage bins.

The listing broker is Ann Cutbill Lenane of Douglas Elliman. 

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