Airbnb is giving you an offer you can’t refuse.

The Staten Island home at 110 Longfellow Ave., which served as the stately English Tudor home of Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando) in the still-iconic 1972 film “The Godfather,” is now up for rent on Airbnb for the entire month of August.

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the famed mafia film, up to five guests will have private access to the 6,248-square-foot spread.

Amenities include a large saltwater pool, a pub in the basement, a game room and a gym.

Booking opens at 1 p.m. ET this Wednesday for a 30-night stay taking place from Aug. 1 to 31 at $50 per night.

That adds up to $1,500 for the month.

This image released by Paramount Pictures shows, from left, James Caan as Sonny Corleone, Marlon Brando as Don Vito Corleone, Al Pacino as Michael Corleone and John Cazale as Fredo Corleone from the 1972 film "The Godfather."
This image released by Paramount Pictures shows, from left, James Caan as Sonny Corleone, Marlon Brando as Don Vito Corleone, Al Pacino as Michael Corleone and John Cazale as Fredo Corleone from the 1972 film “The Godfather.”
AP
The home spans over 3,000 square feet.
The home spans over 6,200 square feet.
Marc McAndrews
The family room with coffered ceilings.
The family room with coffered ceilings.
Marc McAndrews
The formal dining room.
The formal dining room.
Marc McAndrews
The updated kitchen.
The updated kitchen.
Marc McAndrews

Made up of five bedrooms and seven bathrooms, Airbnb describes the home as “most suitable for two adults and three children.”

Located in the affluent neighborhood of Todt Hill, only the home’s exterior was used in the film. Most memorable was the opening scene, which showed the garden party wedding reception for Vito’s daughter, Connie Corleone (played by Talia Shire). This was meant as Corleone’s Long Island home in the movie.

Built in 1930, it last sold in 2016 for $2.4 million.

The home was owned by Edward and Mary Norton for more than half a century until they sold it in 2012 for $1.7 million. From 2012 to 2016, the home underwent a complete renovation.

James Caan, Marlon Brando and the rest of the wedding party in a scene from the film 'The Godfather', 1972.
James Caan, Marlon Brando and the rest of the wedding party in a scene from the film ‘The Godfather,’ 1972.
Getty Images
The bar in the basement.
The bar in the basement.
Marc McAndrews
A study.
A study.
Marc McAndrews
The primary bedroom.
The primary bedroom.
Marc McAndrews
A second bedroom.
A second bedroom.
Marc McAndrews

Next door, at 120 Longfellow, is a residence that served as the home of Michael Corleone (Al Pacino).

Brooklyn natives Elaine and Peter Albert, the latter of whom worked as a urologist, had lived in that home since 1977, when they purchased it for $195,000. After 43 years in the residence where they raised their three children — in May 2020 — the couple said goodbye to their beloved abode and sold the estate for $1.22 million to Philip Pilato.

Fans of the film will remember that just steps from that front gate, small-time crook Carlo Rizzi was whacked by a member of the Corleone crime family. (The film crew used three houses total in this immediate area for the film, building an artificial gate there to create the sense of a compound, as well as kids from the neighborhood as extras.)

A children's bedroom.
A children’s bedroom.
Marc McAndrews
The fitness room.
The fitness room.
Marc McAndrews
The home is made up of four-bedrooms and three-bathrooms.
The expansive backyard with a saltwater pool.
Marc McAndrews

Gianni Russo, who played Rizzi in the Oscar-winning movie directed by Francis Ford Coppola, told The Post in 2019 that he remembered “dying” in front of the Albert home. His character is strangled in the front seat of a car, while he fights to the end.

“Francis wanted me to go through the windshield of the car,” Russo told The Post.

Russo, whose first movie was “The Godfather,” recalled the Albert house being used as a dressing room and a hangout for the actors.

“The actors used to challenge each other to see who could do the better improv,” Russo said. “In that living room, I saw Al Pacino do an improvisation of a one-legged golfer. He bent over to put the ball on the tee, and he fell over.”

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